Category Archives: partner datasets

FAQ: What are the limits of SNAP content?

We have often been asked:

“SNAP” contains the word “Ancient,” which suggests a rather inclusive definition of classical antiquity, but “DRGN” includes “Greco-Roman”, which implies more traditional restriction. Are you interested in prosopographies from outside the strictly Greek and Roman world?

Yes! (Short answer.)

Longer answer is in two parts: Continue reading FAQ: What are the limits of SNAP content?

State of the Snap-Nation

With the end of the pilot project scarily in sight it is time to review where we are and where we hope to be by the end of December.

The big news is that (hopefully) the first set of SNAP identifiers are now frozen!

What this means is that for the first 5 datasets have now been ingested and had SNAP identifiers linked to each of the persons and those identifiers are fixed. There may still be a few tweaks to the RDF descriptive data coming in from the projects but the identifiers will remain the same. Continue reading State of the Snap-Nation

SNAP and VIAF

We’ve had a couple of meetings with Karen Smith-Yoshimura and Thomas Hickey, of the Scholars Contributions to VIAF group, to discuss possible collaborations, exchange of information, and mutual benefits of sharing standards between the SNAP:DRGN project and VIAF (the Virtual International Authority File, a federated authority list of persons from library catalogs, mostly from author or subject fields).

We considered two main questions: Continue reading SNAP and VIAF

Entering the SNAPDRGN garden

Now that the SNAP project has started ingest finalized data from the initial core datasets, it is time to think about how to bring in material from the other partners. For some, this will be easy, as they already know to make available their data in RDF form on the open web and simply need to follow the guidelines in the Cookbook. For others quite a lot of work will be involved getting SNAP ready. This post describes some of the stages you may go through, and some of the problems that you may meet.

I have divided the work into six steps: Continue reading Entering the SNAPDRGN garden