All posts by Gabriel Bodard

SNAP and VIAF

We’ve had a couple of meetings with Karen Smith-Yoshimura and Thomas Hickey, of the Scholars Contributions to VIAF group, to discuss possible collaborations, exchange of information, and mutual benefits of sharing standards between the SNAP:DRGN project and VIAF (the Virtual International Authority File, a federated authority list of persons from library catalogs, mostly from author or subject fields).

We considered two main questions: Continue reading SNAP and VIAF

Minutes of first Advisory Board meeting

SNAP:DRGN Advisory Board

1st meeting Skype (voice only) 2014-05-09

Present: Øyvind Eide (chair), Fabian Koerner, Robert Parker, Laurie Pearce, Charlotte Roueché, Rainer Simon, Gabriel Bodard (principal investigator)

Not present: Sonia Ranade.

The meeting lasted around one hour.

Minutes written by Øyvind Eide based on notes from Laurie Pearce and Rainer Simon. Continue reading Minutes of first Advisory Board meeting

Fluffy dates and associated places

One of the conversations that it was really useful to hash out in person and with the involvement of so many experts and interested parties present at the workshop a couple weeks ago, was the question of how the SNAP:DRGN Cookbook should recommend contributing person-datasets represent date information.

It has been our working assumption that the minimalist information SNAP is ingesting would optionally include a single, undifferentiated, very crudely recorded date associated with  person. (By the same token, any place information associated with a person would be given only in very blunt form, inasmuch as it serves almost as an extra name, epithet or indentifier for a person. Further more granular place association, à la Pelagios, might be included in the original prosopography, and/or in the exposed RDF serialization of said dataset, but SNAP will only expect and take advantage of associated place in the most abstract form.) The argument may be at its clearest with respect to dating, however, partly because there are so many strong arguments for including more granular and semantic date information in a prosopographic dataset. Continue reading Fluffy dates and associated places

Workshop slides and recap

At last week’s SNAP workshop in King’s College London, we had a very successful and enjoyable two-day meeting, introducing the principles of and the preliminary work done by the SNAP:DRGN project in its first three months, and hearing from several potential project partners about their datasets, practices and reactions to our proposals. It was an extremely productive and positive affair, even when discussions sometimes became vigorous! I don’t mean to summarize all of the discussions and outcomes here (a series of blog posts by my colleagues over the next couple of weeks will do more of that), but I will share what I can of the presentations and slideshows that were shown at the workshop. Continue reading Workshop slides and recap

Upcoming workshop on SNAP ontology and data

Next week we shall be hosting a small workshop (already fully booked) at King’s College London to introduce a selection of potential project partners, data providers, advisors and other stakeholders to the SNAP:DRGN project.

The principal aims of the workshop include:

  1. Introduce the goals of the SNAP:DRGN project, the core datasets (LGPN, TM, PIR) and their current formats and contents, and the data models and ontologies that we propose to use for the preliminary data ingest.
  2. Learn about other prosopographical and linked data approaches in use in history and the digital humanities.
  3. Learn about other classical person datasets that might be suitable for exposing in SNAP-recommended RDF format and adding to our triplestore.

Continue reading Upcoming workshop on SNAP ontology and data

Networking Ancient People (press release)

SNAPsideA consortium led by scholars in Digital Humanities at King’s College London has been awarded an AHRC Digital Transformations Big Data grant to develop links between several databases of people from classical antiquity. The SNAP:DRGN project (“Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies: Data and Relations in Greco-roman Names”), will work with partners at Oxford, Southampton, Edinburgh, Leuven in Belgium, and Duke in the United States, to create standards for bringing together references that are to the same or related people from ancient Greek and Latin texts. Continue reading Networking Ancient People (press release)